Staffing deficits require prison nurses to work overtime

When employees of Missouri companies are asked to work extra hours outside of their designated hours, they have the right to be paid overtime. According to state and federal guidelines, employees should receive one and a half times their standard pay rate during all overtime hours worked. Any overtime pay that is accrued by employees should be received within the pay period it was earned. Companies who fail to abide by the law are subject to legal punishment.  In a recent case out of Ohio, there has been a growing concern as prison nurses are being asked to work excessive overtime to make up the difference for a significant deficit in the number of needed employees. The problem stems from a shortage of registered nurses who are willing to work in a prison environment. Organizational leaders suspect that an environment as rigid as a prison may be a bit unsettling for many job seekers. However, the lack of interest in the profession has made it so that nurses working overtime has increased a stunning 60 percent since the year 2012. 
With 50 job vacancies, prison management are relying on the nurses they do have to work extra overtime to keep things running smoothly. Leaders have suggested that a viable solution would be to reduce the number of prisoners, especially those that are aging and have more prevalent health care needs.  If people are being asked to work overtime but are concerned about getting everything they have been promised, they may benefit from the help of an attorney. A legal professional can provide insight and help assess the situation to determine if there are any discrepancies in pay.  Source: U.S. News, “Overtime Pay for Prison Nurses Costs Millions of Tax Dollars,” Jun 18, 2018
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2018-06-18T22:51:55+00:00Overtime Pay|